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Newb_Debat0r

On reading fast

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thats not the issue at all.

the issue is when the negative (or affirmative) issues an 'argument' without warrants, without comprehensible warrants, or lacking substance whatsoever.

 

if the story is clear and warranted and dropped, there is no reason not to vote for it.

 

but the problem is what happens when the story is not there. when there are no warrants to the evidence. when its effectively just a claim. whats stopping the neg from dropping a quick one liner disad without evidence? "subpoint 32. plan leads to nuclear holocaust."

 

according to my opposition, the neg wins when they say that and the aff doesnt respond. i think thats asanine.

 

 

ok well I guess I interpreted it wrong, I thought you all meant if the negative extended it and explained but the cards weren't warranted well it wouldn't be voted for. My thing was, if the cards are crap but the aff doesn't bring that issue up and the neg gets up in the 2nr and explains the disad i wouldn't consider whether the evidence was warranted because that is the debater's job.

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Just a question of opinion here... one that is mildly related to speaking drills as long as we are on the subject.

 

Every other week or so I have my students spread a card at the end of our speaking drills and I put their times on the board with the number of words in the card (I count them out before hand) then I convert that into WPM. Do you think this strategy is inspirational for the students to try harder or discouraging to the students that are slower.

 

One thing to keep in mind before I hear the -slow kid sob story- is that all my students that participate do so voluntarily (only mild coaxing, bribing, & threatening on my part) inside & outside of class.

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Debate's a competition; if they can't handle having their WPM compared to each other, then the activity is probably not for them.

 

It's really not a question of competition, but how much emphasis you put on it.

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I dont necessarily agree with the competition on speed primarily because although speed is a tool which can be effectively used quite often, its not necessary to win rounds even against a faster opponent.

 

I think more important than WPM is a EPW statistic - Errors per Word. Everytime the students stumble, skip a word, are unclear on a word, mispronounce, etc etc etc, thats an error. Fixing the errors goes a lot farther than speed.

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EPC- Errors per card sounds better. If they are struggling with pronouncing words they need to rethink debate and take up ESL.

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no. cards have variable lengths. therefore, you put them in buckets based on speed - it really should be Errors per WPM - to account for slower and faster speaking debaters.

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no. cards have variable lengths. therefore, you put them in buckets based on speed - it really should be Errors per WPM - to account for slower and faster speaking debaters.

 

Yea that works

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I like the concept of the errors/wpm strategy, and I completely agree with your earlier post on cutting out errors = time trade off. But it's difficult for the students to become familliar with a lot of words/pronunciations (esp. in relation to authors) it's not something that can be quickly taught. Although, if you do have some drill that I could have my students work on I would be more than willing to incorporate it into their drills.

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i think more than anything you are best off working on vocal warm up drills and phonetics. people discount vocal warm up drills... but they really help with speaking in the long term. there is a reason why professionals do it - and its not to be pretentious. if you warm up before exercise (i.e. using your muscles) why wouldnt you also want to warm up the muscles in your throat controlling your speech before speaking?

 

tongue twisters - you can do that quite well with a variety of tongue twisters and the dictionary drill (which is educational too!). simply select a few of the thousands of tongue twisters you can find online and make sure that the ones you select target different sounds.

 

dictionary drill - flip to a page in the dictionary (preselected by you based on the sounds you want to work on) and have the student start reading. the dictionary is one of the toughest pages to read because there are rarely any complete sentences. phrases are quite short, punctuation is often somewhat confusing, and there are lots of abbreviations which need to be spoken. the student doesnt say "n dot" or "n period" when they see "n." they should say "noun." this drill is particularly useful for practicing certain sounds that a student is having difficulty with, learning new words and increasing vocabulary AND getting used to odd punctuation and weird syntax.

 

there are many drills to work on phonetics but many of them require a trained or simply very acute listener to catch the problems so you know what to target.

 

as a general rule, most people have a tendency to speak certain sounds incorrectly - especially when speaking quickly. when i debated years back, i noticed in my own speech that when i speak quickly i tend to slightly soften the hard '-ch' sound (as in the word in speech) and turn it into a softer '-sch' sound (but not quite so soft as a '-sh' sound).

 

every public school has a speech therapist who works with kids with speech impediments. it might be possible to get a few minutes of her time to get her to help out the team once every two weeks for an hour or so and see a couple students to give them tips. obviously its best to work with the novices because they have the best opportunity to improve their speech before they create habits from experience in speaking quickly.

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that 100 pages probably wasn't for just 8 minutes (the 1nc); it must've included the entire file, which encompasses anything and everythign you might want to read for that one off.

 

drills to get faster:

1. pencil in mouth (just past canines)- 3 minutes

2. overexaggeration (look in the mirror when you do this at first. make sure your lips are pulled back and barely over your teeth. you should look kind of weird.) - 3 min

3. speed - 6 min

4. backwards (including tags, dates, and words separated by hyphens) - 3 min

5. put "the", "and", and "uh" between each word - 3 min

 

try doing about 20 minutes of drills per day of cold-reading (reading something you haven't read before. this would be a good time to read that new file or perhaps a textbook). being consistent is key.

 

also, practice taking deep and efficient breaths, rather than the infamous triple-breath every few words.

 

g'luck.

Thanks Ill be trying that

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how do people calculate spreading into words per minute? like do they just count the words on the page and average it etc?

also i hear certain fonts are clinically faster to read. i know this may be minute but im just curious because it sounds funny... any fact in there?

 

From my knowledge, it is faster to read in fonts like Times New Roman than in a font like Arial. The reason is that Times in a serif font, which means it has "Legs" on the bottom of letters, giving a sort of underlining effect. it helps your eyes stay on track. Of course, since 99% of the top debaters underline cards, this is most likely nullified.. but hey, maybe it does help. I just like the font so i use it anyway.

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