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'Hardest' debate positions

Hardest debate positions  

425 members have voted

  1. 1. Hardest debate positions

    • 1A
      112
    • 2A
      84
    • 1N
      11
    • 2N
      219


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1AR is the hardest. 13 minutes of arguments to answer.

 

The 1N is the easiest in my opinion.

The 2A is dependent on the 1A. I'm the 2A, and the constructive is pretty much fitting blocks to opponent arguments and the rebuttal quality depends primarily on how good a job the 1A did answering the block.

2N is 2nd most difficult in my eyes.

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i have a weird aff where EVERYTHING is dependant on the 2ac and if that is screwed up or mishandled then the whole debate is blown. But whith others i think that the 2a and 2n are pretty close. the 1ar answereing the block i think is overrated in terms of difficulty, sure its hard but does it outway the 1ac, i dont think so. Regardless i see everyone agrees the 1n is the easiest (no offense to any 1n's out there)

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In my opinion, the 2NR is the hardest speech in debate, followed by the 1AR. Overall, I'd say the 2N is the toughest position.

Sorry for the double post but, i'll agree with you on that the 1ar is hardest but i think the 2ar and 2nr are tied in terms of responsability.

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speeches in order of difficultly (as far as I'm concerned):

1AR (has to answer the block)

2NR (has to preemt the 2AR)

2AC (if it messes up, the debate is over)

2AR (has to make up lots of new stuff and make it sound like they're extending the 1AR)

2NC

1NR (has more than 8 minutes to prep)

1NC (it should be preped out and ready)

1AC (it's already written)

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1N is almost entirely scripted and has 8 minutes+ to prep it's rebuttel - this is by far the easiest position, though a stellar 1NR is, in my mind, the most strategically smart thing to have cuz 1AR's undercover it.

 

The 2AC can be frontlined like nobody's business, and you just have to answer what the 2NR goes for - a second runner up for easist.

 

Though the 1AR has to answer the block, it's constructive is entirely scripted 100%.

 

The 2N, though, has both of the situations that make it harder. 1) It has to make an original position in the 2NC, e.g. can't be entirely scripted with frontlines cuz it changes depending on the 2AC answers, and the 2NR has to pick and choose what to go for.

 

On the basis alone that the 2N is the only position where both of their speeches are 100% original, and can't really be scripted out, I'd say it takes the most creativity/most work.

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I'll go with the 1AR as the hardest in terms of which speech is the hardest to give, followed by the 2NR. But in terms of overall difficulty of the position, the 2N is probably the hardest.

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Personnaly, I think any speech can be the hardest (excluding the 1ac of course, cuz you should know the 1ac). It all matters on the case, the judge, the arguments. A speech can be hard 1 round and be easier in another.

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We have to look at argument responsibilities too. The 2N has to have a strat against every case, prepped out, while the 2A needs blocks for only 1, and 1A needs a 1AC and that is it...

 

1a/2n is toughest, followed by double twos then 1n/2a

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Danm right its the 2n! It is the only position that the debater really wins by themself! The 2a relies on the 1ar, the 2n can and usually goes for his/her args from the 2nc

-Go to Great Lakes Elite thread if from the area

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I agree entirely: After a year and a half of 1A, and half a year of 2A, I must say 2A is harder. You become the person who has to think of the analitics and interpret all their arguments. The 1A just extends whatever is dropped.

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Eh...aff is harder to judge which is harder.

 

1) While it's true that the 1AR has to answer the block, if the 2AC put good arguments on the flow, the block might be harder, making the 1AR easier because there were good arguments on the flow that the neg might not have had decent answers to.

 

2) However, if the 2AC didn't have decent answers to say, a krazy kritik, then the 1AR is harder because it has to extend shitty answers. However, this doesn't make the 1AR harder necessarily. If the 1AR is only decent on the krazy kritik, and the 2NR is stellar, than the 2AR could arguably be harder than the 1AR, because he's the last chance to pull the debate out from the muck.

 

3) In my opinion though, the biggest factor is not by a speaker position basis, but rather on a team-by-team basis. If you're the 2A, and you have a shitty 1A, your 2AR's are obviously going to be difficult. Inveresly, if your 2A sucks, your 1AR's are going to be a lot harder. However, if your partner is good, your speeches therefore are much easier, because you (probably) have more to work with. And if you go ins and outs, well then it's pretty obvious who has the harder job.

 

On the neg

 

No question that the 2N has the harder job. However, speaking as a 1N, I would say that (on this thread) the 2NC has been highly overrated as a difficult speech, and the 1NR has been underrated in terms of strategy, and, well, difficulty.

 

2NC - People say that the 2NC is 100% original, but if you know your arguments/have evidence/are a competent debater, it really isn't. When I listen to my partner in the background of my prepping, I can hear her reading a lot of cards to answer the 2AC. Good neg strats will have good 2NC blocks to common 2AC arguments, especially things like perms and such. Not to say that the 2NC isn't difficult - it's just not as hard as, say, the 2NR.

 

1NR - Sure, it has 8 minuts of prep (11, counting cross-x). However, for good teams (or at least for me and my partner), the 1NR is a crucial speech. Like I said, my partner takes arguments that we might have a lot of blocks too. However, if my partner has a must-win disad or CP, or and argument she really doesn't understand, or topicality (especially topicality), she throws it to me. That way, we don't have to take half of our prep for it. Our rounds usually depend on how well I handle the crucial arguments, or the poorly blocked ones. Obviously, the 2NR is more difficult - I just think the 1NR is underrated.

 

The 2NR is obviously the hardest speech on the neg, possibly in the debate. Once again, though, so much depends on how good your partner is, and how good your case/neg strat is.

 

In terms of combining both sides, in my opinion, the hardest to easiest speaker positions are as follows (not counting in's and out's)

Double 2's

1A/2N

2A/1N

Double 1's

 

(The reason I place double 2's above 1A/2N is that, while the 1AR is difficult, the 1AC is prepared *hopefully*, and that double 2's doens't have any completely prepared. Double 1's is on the bottom because although the 1AR is difficult, it has 2 prepared speeches out of four.)

 

And that's my 2 cents on the matter. Proceed to rip apart my post.

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The Neg

1nc - This is the easiest speech on this side, although its probably slightly harder than the 1ac based on the fact it does change depending on the aff.

2mc - A good neg team will have prepped lots of blocks to answer the args that everyone reads against their corps off-case positions, so this is kind of equivilent to the 2ac, in that to a degree u can pull blocks and apply them to what the other team said. It is probably slightly harder than the 2ac though because the chances of not having blocks that apply to another team's arg is more likely than in the 2ac.

1nr - A good 2nr will be willing to go for the args in the 1nr, making it an important, if not overly difficult given the amount of prep time, speech.

2nr - probably the most important speech for the neg. You have to preempt the 2ac in addition to doing everything else needed to win your positions. However, there often are easy 2nrs to be had if the block is well done, because 1ars tend to have some holes.

 

The aff

1ac - easiest speech. Premade, and you should know it like the back of your hand.

2ac - more difficult than people give it credit for. This is where all of the strategic decisions for the aff are made. Yes you probably have blocks to most/all of the neg positions, but if your blocks are good (and the neg read a decent number of positions), you won't have time (or perhaps the desire) to read the entire block. 2ac time allocation can do a lot for getting the neg to kick a certain positions. The 2ac has to do a lot of guess work on where they think the neg is going to end up in the 2nr, and put more answers there. If they mess this up, the 1ar is already screwed.

1ar - not as difficult I think as some people make it out to be. Yes you have 13 min of the block to answer, but you won't be extending all of the 2ac positions. If the 2ac is good, you can usually jettison a good number of 2ac responses to focus more on the args that are most important/the block slightly under covered. The 1ar should also be fairly familiar with the 2ac blocks, so they should be able to extend fairly efficiently (many 1ars write the warrants on the side of the 2ac block next to a card).

2ar - A good 2ar is important, but there are rounds where you know that you have already lost, or that you have basically (barring a monumental screwup) won. However, in those inbetween rounds, the 2ar can do a lot to pull victory from the flames of defeat. If you can be slimey enough to convince the judge that you didnt in fact drop that key arg in the 1ar, or morph 2ac unconvincing 2ac args into roundwinners based on how the neg went for their positions, you can win. However, most judges who take a little bit of time to think about their decision will usually see through the 2ar bs and stick you with whatever it is was in the 2ac/1ar.

 

So I think the hardest spots are between the 2a and the 2n, with the 2n coming out as a little harder because of the difficulty of the 2nr compared with the 2ar.

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Going in and out is a bitch, but I have to with my partner so I really don't have a traditional position.

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Going in and out is a bitch, but I have to with my partner so I really don't have a traditional position.

 

there's a thousand things about this that makes me laugh.

 

that being said . . .

 

keep on going in and out with your partner, maybe it wouldn't be such a bitch if you just stuck to missionary?

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I voted for the 2N for a couple of reasons, some may have already been stated. 1) The 2N has no ability to have prepped out speeches, unless he/she reads a theory block on perms or something in the 2NC. This makes all of their speeches much more difficult that any of the others since they are 100% original from the get-go. 2) They have to be able to persuade the judge to vote for them in the 2NR, and be able to pre-empt anything that the 2AR is going to say. They have to be so persuasive and be winning on all fronts for the judge to remember their arguments at the end of the round, especially if the judge isn't a flow judge. 3) Although it is usually a joint decision, the 2N has to make the tough decision as to what to go for in the 2NR and decide on what arguments the negative has the best chance of winning. That can be kinda difficult, especially if you are winning several arguments and go for too much, and stretch yourself out. 4) Impact calculus. Although a lot of this is going down in the block, I like to devote a large portion of my 2NR to impact calc, since in most rounds, thats what it comes down to. It's important to get the negatives story firmly lined out, and there has to be someone to articulate those impacts fluently/persuasively, since there's only 5 minutes.

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I find the neg to be the considerably easier side, and thus has the easier speeches. The negative will (for the most part) not lose a round because they drop one argument. All the 1NC has to do is read a couple of time sucks and some good off case, get to on case (which a good neg team in the state of MI will have preped out before the round). The 2NC/1NR just extends some of these arguments, answers the aff arguments and has the right to drop some. The 2NR then drops some more, and on one or two flows answers everything. It is not immidiate game over for the neg if the drop an argument or two, they just go for another flow.

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I think being the 2n is the hardest position overall for many reasons covered on this forum, but the 2a's should definitly come before teh 1a's on a good team. First of all because the 2a has to go for the case in the end odds are they cut at least most of the 1ac the 1a reads. Additionally, everyone writes off the 2a is easy because of blocks, but A) the 2a had to make those blocks in a strategic time efficent manner B) the 2ac has to keep track of how far their going on blocks and time being prepared to spend 1 minute or a whole speech on a position depending on the 1nc. I'll give that the 1ar is harder than the 2ar, but only by a bit, the 2ar has too be a beautiful story teller and do a lot(5 minutes) with what the 1ar did far less on with out making new arguments. In round 2ac+2ar>1ac+1ar and out of round work there is no comparison. Beyond being time consuming finding good answers to certain positions is difficult as well, so out of round work should definitly beconsidered in ranking how hard a position is.

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