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Who replaced Harriet Miers as White House Counsel?

 

During what event did most major US newspapers expand to publishing 7 days a week?

 

What winter date marks the "day the music died"?

 

In Elkins v. United States (1960), the Supreme Court struck down the "Silver Platter Doctrine" that had allowed federal prosecuters to do what?

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During what event did most major US newspapers expand to publishing 7 days a week?

 

The Civil War? Random guess...

 

What winter date marks the "day the music died"?

 

February 3, 1959.

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The Civil War? Random guess...

 

 

 

February 3, 1959.

Both correct.

 

 

Who replaced Harriet Miers as White House Counsel?

 

In Elkins v. United States (1960), the Supreme Court struck down the "Silver Platter Doctrine" that had allowed federal prosecuters to do what?

 

Why did Belgian authorities recently take down a highway traffic sign instructing truck drivers not to pass other cars during bad weather?

 

What weekly newspaper, now purportedly dating back to the 15th century, is run by the "Zweibel" family?

 

The Falkland Islands are known in Argentina by what different name?

 

What governor is now in the hospital following a car accident involving his motorcade?

 

Which president pardoned the greatest number of people individually (not in groups, like Carter and the Vietnam draft-dodgers)?

 

And on the same note, to whom were the first pardons given?

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In Elkins v. United States (1960), the Supreme Court struck down the "Silver Platter Doctrine" that had allowed federal prosecuters to do what?

The Elkins decision put a stop to the practice of federal prosecutors using evidence that had been illegally obtained by state law enforcement agents to pursue prosecution under federal statutes...

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In Elkins v. United States (1960), the Supreme Court struck down the "Silver Platter Doctrine" that had allowed federal prosecuters to do what?

The Elkins decision put a stop to the practice of federal prosecutors using evidence that had been illegally obtained by state law enforcement agents to pursue prosecution under federal statutes...

Correct

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The Falkland Islands are known in Argentina by what different name?

 

What governor is now in the hospital following a car accident involving his motorcade?

 

The Malvinas.

 

Governor Corzine of New Jersey.

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Harriet Miers was replaced by Fred Fielding, i believe. And Elkins didn't single-handedly get rid of the use of illegally procured evidence; it was simply one case in a line of several cases that, when taken as a lump of jurisprudence, got rid of the use of illegally procured evidence.

 

...if you want to get technical about it.

 

brennan

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And Elkins didn't single-handedly get rid of the use of illegally procured evidence; it was simply one case in a line of several cases that, when taken as a lump of jurisprudence, got rid of the use of illegally procured evidence.

 

...if you want to get technical about it.

Okay, let's get technical about it! ;)

 

My argument is that Elkins specifically barred the use of evidence illegally obtained by state law enforcement agents from being used in a federal proceeding. That is, in fact, what I wrote. It was not my claim that Elkins "single-handedly got rid of the use of illegally procured evidence." It closed one very specific 4th Amendment loophole...

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For those not clear on the matter, Elkins was about the sort of situation where, say, a murderer was about to get off on a state rap because of an evidence-suppression issue. Sometimes, in those types of situations, the state folks would bring in the Feds, who would proceed to charge the miscreant with some "civil rights" charge, using the illegally-obtained evidence (which was, until Elkins, legit) to get a conviction that way...

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The Malvinas.

 

Governor Corzine of New Jersey.

Both correct.

 

Harriet Miers was replaced by Fred Fielding, i believe. And Elkins didn't single-handedly get rid of the use of illegally procured evidence; it was simply one case in a line of several cases that, when taken as a lump of jurisprudence, got rid of the use of illegally procured evidence.
Fielding is right. As for the Elkins question, Shu is correct, it specifically dealt with the evidence obtained by a state in a manner that would be illegitimate for the feds to obtain it (whether it was admissible under state rules is irrelevant) then being used in a federal case. This practice was known as the "Silver Platter Doctrine" (which is why I gave both that and Elkins as clues).

 

 

Why did Belgian authorities recently take down a highway traffic sign instructing truck drivers not to pass other cars during bad weather?

 

What weekly newspaper, now purportedly dating back to the 15th century, is run by the "Zweibel" family?

 

Which president pardoned the greatest number of people individually (not counting blanket pardons for groups of people, like Carter and the Vietnam draft-dodgers)?

 

And on the same note, to whom were the first presidential pardons given?

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Okay, let's get technical about it! ;)

 

My argument is that Elkins specifically barred the use of evidence illegally obtained by state law enforcement agents from being used in a federal proceeding. That is, in fact, what I wrote. It was not my claim that Elkins "single-handedly got rid of the use of illegally procured evidence." It closed one very specific 4th Amendment loophole...

 

this is me, standing corrected. i guess i misread your post. sorry shu.

 

brennan

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This wonderful thread is dead. Time to revive it with new Trivia Questions.

 

 

 

Which 6 major league baseball teams wear blue (not navy) caps as part of their standard uniform?

 

US Hwy 491 was renamed that in 2003 at the Behest of Gov. Bill Richardson. Why?

 

Mswati III is the King of What country?

 

Which center, in the top 5 of the NBA's all time scorers, never fouled out of a game?

 

What is the largest city on New Zealands south island?

 

What is the only major North American city built around a mountain?

 

What is the only state capital thats not a county seat?

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Which center, in the top 5 of the NBA's all time scorers, never fouled out of a game?

 

What is the only state capital thats not a county seat?

 

Wilt Chamberlain?

 

Is the state capital question a trick question? I think Louisiana has parishes and Alaska has boroughs.

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This wonderful thread is dead. Time to revive it with new Trivia Questions.
Next week is finals for me, so this is a very busy time. I'll be posting questions more regularly after then.

 

 

US Hwy 491 was renamed that in 2003 at the Behest of Gov. Bill Richardson. Why?

Because it had been #666

 

Mswati III is the King of What country?

Malawi

 

Which center, in the top 5 of the NBA's all time scorers, never fouled out of a game?

Well, besides Chamberlain who's already been guessed, I think there are only two other centers in the top 5. I think Kareem had to have fouled out at least once in 20+ years, so how about Moses Malone?

 

What is the largest city on New Zealands south island?

Wellington

 

What is the only major North American city built around a mountain?

Do you mean completely circumscribing the mountain? Because there are plenty that are built near (around) mountains, every city in Hawaii to name a few.

 

What is the only state capital thats not a county seat?

Assuming this isn't a trick question St. Paul, MN?

 

Why did Belgian authorities recently take down a highway traffic sign instructing truck drivers not to pass other cars during bad weather?

Because it used 7 different symbols, including redundant ones, to convey the message. It was feared that drivers reading the sign would cause more accidents than trucks violating the rule.

 

What weekly newspaper, now purportedly dating back to the 15th century, is run by the "Zweibel" family?

 

Which president pardoned the greatest number of people individually (not counting blanket pardons for groups of people, like Carter and the Vietnam draft-dodgers)?

 

And on the same note, to whom were the first presidential pardons given?

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Which 6 major league baseball teams wear blue (not navy) caps as part of their standard uniform?

 

 

The Cubs, Mets, Dodgers, Royals, Rangers and Brewers?

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What weekly newspaper, now purportedly dating back to the 15th century, is run by the "Zweibel" family?

 

The Onion, America's Finest News Source. I miss the Herbert Kornfeld columns, though.

 

Which president pardoned the greatest number of people individually (not counting blanket pardons for groups of people, like Carter and the Vietnam draft-dodgers)?

 

Man, I'm thinking it is W or Clinton, but that might be because it has become more reported...hell, let's say Clinton.

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The Onion, America's Finest News Source. I miss the Herbert Kornfeld columns, though.
As do I, correct.

 

Man, I'm thinking it is W or Clinton, but that might be because it has become more reported...hell, let's say Clinton.
Nope, neither one.

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Which president pardoned the greatest number of people individually (not counting blanket pardons for groups of people, like Carter and the Vietnam draft-dodgers)?

Just a guess, but how about the guy who held the office longer than anyone else (FDR)? More opportunities = more pardons, right?

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FDR=correct.
QED. One of my former debaters who majored in PolSci passed along another interesting tidbit: Seven Presidents since 1900 had higher clemency percentages than FDR (i.e., they granted a greater proportion of clemency requests than FDR did). Name them. (Hint: Clinton and Bush II aren't on the list, because the stats aren't available.)

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what latin phrase does the acronym "QED" represent and what does it mean?

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Quod erat demonstrandum. It basically means "which is what I set out to prove." You see it at the end of math proofs in older textbooks. You still see it these days, but a large-font square is more en vogue. I have no idea why. The square looks stupid and out-of-place.

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