Jump to content
ChI ToWn PrInCeSs

Things you know now that you wish you would have known your novice year.

Recommended Posts

Indeed. At states I faced a team with 5 full tubs of evidence that didn't know what "framework" was (first C-X question "what does 'framework' mean?). They insisted they didn't "advocate a framework, but we will argue you should vote on advantages for certain reasons, like timeframe, probability, moral obligation..." I'm not sure which framework that is.

 

It's the end of my novice year, and I wish I had known that spending a couple days on a CP can help you own cases with ridiculously strong advantages (and we solve for the HIGHEST risk of nuke war with the heg advantage and the GREATEST POSSIBLE magnitude with extinction from bioterror and we have the MORAL OBLIGATION to give people water, and we MUST act on human rights abuse from....)

 

I also wish I knew how to handle second rebuttals. I still kind of do. Everybody tells me to spend less on the line-by-line and more overview, and then 100% of the winning teams seem to spend 4:30 of their 2Rs on line-by-line...

 

And finally, I wish I had known that no matter what you do, there is no way to avoid arbitrary judging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm still a novice, but something I just learned:

Aff cases are great for writting papers on. (Thank you, AP Human Geography!)

 

 

i took that calss when i was at ho-flo, does solamon still teach it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm still a novice, but I wish I knew going maverick isn't as bad as it sounds. I went mav my first tournament, and went 3-1.

 

I also wish I knew not to get stressed out, just in general. It's not as nerve-wracking as it seems at first.

 

And I wish I had more files going in, but I had some pretty good stuff under my belt. Just make sure you know everything about your arguments and don't get trapped.

 

And don't be afraid of running malthus.

 

Do be afraid of malthus. Very afraid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do be afraid of malthus. Very afraid.

See, I don't see Malthus as particularly dangerous. I must admit, I haven't hit it yet, so I guess I can't talk, but it's a pretty ridiculous argument. The uniqueness is ridiculously aweful, there's no real brink, the link is as generic as you could imagine and the science behind this is generally not accepted today, so there's tons of evidence against it. The internal link is really sketchy, since once people start dying Malthusianly it would provide negative feedback and stop the cycle of death, and the impact, even if they could win that it WERE extinction (which is too unlikely for words) generally wouldn't outweigh case, and by definition will lose on timeframe. Then you pull across all the other attacks to own on probability.

 

Plus, it doesn't turn any moral obligation or otherwise deontological advantages, or any not related to death. AND it is the most morally bankrupt argument I have ever seen; everybody has evidence saying (and I agree) that killing to save lives is inherently flawed.

 

And of course, everybody has a block against Malthus.

 

 

Now Consult NATO CP...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I knew that it is okay to ask for help from other teams.

Hahaha, for the longest time I thought it was treason to find help from outside the school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Find out what ASPEC and OSPEC mean before you go to a tournament. It's a simple argument to understand. But it's so hard to catch on, if you don't know the argument before hand.

 

While that's true for many arguments, it's the thing that really stuck out in my mind as a novice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. It's okay to beef up your case (correctly of course)-- don't count on varsity to do it for you.

 

2. Bring timers

 

3. Be persuasive, not commanding, in rebuttals.

 

4. Ask for judging preferences. (I hate "paradigm")

 

5. GO INTO EVERY ROUND ORGANIZED! We've all done it, and we've all lost because of it.

 

6. Be confident in general

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting into arguments with your partner during the round is NOT a good idea.

 

Walking out on your partner in the middle of a round isn't either.

 

Malthus isn't as scary as they make it seem.

 

The number of tubs doesn't matter as much as you think, quality over quantity.

 

And that Cross-x existed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

actually ask questions in CX

 

bring your own timer

 

and that extemporaneous speaking really helps in your speeches

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I knew that most judges don't care if you mess up and say "vote aff." when your neg... god times, good times

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes its much better to just slow the hell down and not try to read as fast as your opp. explain your cards and talk to the judge! Know you solvency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. never overestimate your opponent

 

2. never underestimate your opponent

 

3. just try not to estimate at all

 

4. motels are scary

 

5. do NOT stay up till 3am watching a horror movie about scary motels - in a scary motel

 

6. you will lose your voice at the most inconvenient times

 

7. you will probably try to continue competing without your voice

 

8. when told you should drop out, you will try to convince your coach that your voice was only holding you back

 

9. just because you joined debate, does not mean your parents/teachers/coworkers/strangers on the street will concede to your arguments - however brilliant they may be

 

 

 

it was a very interesting year..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

excuse me if you thought i was talking to myself but as my real first time here i wasn't sure how to reply to the users i was actually talking to so my bad....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That Inherencey is in fact not a good argument

it really isn't but if your judge is a stocks judge then you can still win on it...most people have a hard time understanding what inherency really is so if you're confident in your understanding of it you can use it to your advantage big time!! hope the best for next season....we'll talk later :)

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To pay attention to what you read, and if you run a CP, to actually read a CP text.

lol...that might seem like something dumb to some people but you'd be surprised how many people have done it...i've had that happen in rounds before...since i wasn't sure about CP my opponent got away with it...:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That flowing *is*, in fact, necessary. Yeah, I didn't understand this until my second or third tournament. Whoops.

i so agree with you...next year i am so keeping every flow and organizing and stuff...don't forget dates are extremely important too!! :) btw...don't feel bad...i didn't really realize how important they were until districts...now that's another thing i wish i had in mind...that there's always another level...like state and then nationals and stuff because then i think i wouldve been more prepared and not taken things so lightly...i mean it's not like i didn't work at my stuff...i just could've done a lot better and gotten involved in the world events and understanding all the structure of debate and what the best ways to end speeches or structure speeches are...anyways...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. never overestimate your opponent

 

2. never underestimate your opponent

 

3. just try not to estimate at all

it was a very interesting year..

 

That's good advice to not over or underestimate your opponents because people might seem intimidating but they might just talk crap and the novices or just people that you might underestimate might not be so fluent but they may have interesting ideas and hit you in small details the judge falls for or they just know how to defend or take you down...anyways...it's hard to know so that's good advice...hope next year is great for you...we'll talk later :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm still a novice, but something I just learned:

Aff cases are great for writting papers on. (Thank you, AP Human Geography!)

i so agree with you on that!! Right during debate season we had the biggest project in geography and we were doing africa so you know that was thorough...your teachers get impressed :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...