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I think the government should have it fully regulated and breed the most possibly potent strain and give it to the public for free to relieve stress and kick back.

 

Call it... Soma

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I think the government should have it fully regulated and breed the most possibly potent strain and give it to the public for free to relieve stress and kick back.

 

Call it... Soma

 

For the love of Ford, give Rawrcat some special role that helps us all, perhaps "World Controller"?

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http://sentencing.typepad.com/sentencing_law_and_policy/2011/12/report-shows-fewer-traffic-fatalities-after-states-pass-medical-pot-laws.html

 

The title of this post is the headline of this recent press report, which gets started this way:

 

The passage of state medical-marijuana laws is associated with a subsequent drop in the rate of traffic fatalities, according to a newly released study by two university professors.

 

The study — by University of Colorado Denver professor Daniel Rees and Montana State University professor D. Mark Anderson — found that the traffic-death rate drops by nearly 9 percent in states after they legalize marijuana for medical use. The researchers arrived at that figure, Rees said, after controlling for other variables such as changes in traffic laws, seat-belt usage and miles driven. The study stops short of saying the medical-marijuana laws cause the drop in traffic deaths. "We were pretty surprised that they went down," Rees said Tuesday.

 

The study was posted this month on the website of the Bonn, Germany- based Institute for the Study of Labor and has not yet been peer-reviewed. Rees said the main reason for the drop appears to be that medical-marijuana laws mean young people spend less time drinking and more time smoking cannabis. Legalization of medical marijuana, the researchers report, is associated with a 12-percent drop in the alcohol-related fatal-crash rate and a 19-percent decrease in the fatality rate of people in their 20s, according to the study.

 

The study also found that medical- marijuana legalization is associated with a drop in beer sales. "The result that comes through again and again and again is (that) young adults . . . drink less when marijuana is legalized and traffic fatalities go down," Rees said.

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i just want to say real quickly, that while i dont think pot should be legalized, i DO think it should be de-criminalized.

Give a fine, confiscate the weed, and let the guy go. Someone shouldnt be locked up for smoking weed. You arent protecting anybody by doing that

just saying.

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Hey guess what!

Marijuana has never killed a single person in the whole of recorded human history. (http://drugwarfacts.org/cms/?q=node/30)

It's also less addictive than caffeine. (http://www.drugsense.org/mcwilliams/www.marijuanamagazine.com/toc/addictiv.htm)

Gateway theory is bogus, especially for marijuana. (http://healthland.time.com/2010/10/29/marijuna-as-a-gateway-drug-the-myth-that-will-not-die/)

We spend a lot of money keeping marijuana illegal. (http://www.drugsense.org/cms/wodclock)

Taxation also brings in a lot of revenue. (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1889166,00.html)

Making marijuana illegal has had virtually no effect on reducing its usage. (http://www.ukcia.org/research/young/adolescent.php)

Marijuana prohibition is inherently rooted in racism. (http://www.drugwarrant.com/articles/why-is-marijuana-illegal/)

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Hey guess what!

Marijuana has never killed a single person in the whole of recorded human history. (http://drugwarfacts.org/cms/?q=node/30)

It's also less addictive than caffeine. (http://www.drugsense...oc/addictiv.htm)

Gateway theory is bogus, especially for marijuana. (http://healthland.ti...t-will-not-die/)

We spend a lot of money keeping marijuana illegal. (http://www.drugsense.org/cms/wodclock)

Taxation also brings in a lot of revenue. (http://www.time.com/...1889166,00.html)

Making marijuana illegal has had virtually no effect on reducing its usage. (http://www.ukcia.org.../adolescent.php)

Marijuana prohibition is inherently rooted in racism. (http://www.drugwarra...ijuana-illegal/)

 

That's quite a collection of completely unbiased sources of information.

 

There's certainly a case to be made for decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana, but the claims of the crowd that views getting high as the solution to all of life's problems are just as ridiculous and hyperbolic as the claims of those who equate marijuana with heroin or crack.

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That's quite a collection of completely unbiased sources of information.

 

I admit that a lot of the evidence comes from pretty biased sources, but the data is clear.

Not a single recorded instance of death is hard to distort.

 

The evidence about addictiveness of marijuana is actually really good in its procedure.

 

The arguments against the gateway effect are fairly logical, everyone who smoked marijuana started with water yknow? Most musicians have a collection of skinny jeans and therefore skinny jeans result in musical talent. Most gun owners first get firearm training, therefore we should ban firearm training to reduce the number of people who possess guns.

 

We also cant say why not because of the massive costs the drug war is imposing on the government.

 

Number of people who use or have used marijuana is massive and is increasing rapidly, it can then be shown that prohibition is ineffective.

 

Plus when analyzing the roots of marijuana prohibition the motivating factors were primarily discriminatory against other races.

 

There's certainly a case to be made for decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana, but the claims of the crowd that views getting high as the solution to all of life's problems are just as ridiculous and hyperbolic as the claims of those who equate marijuana with heroin or crack.

 

I merely say that marijuana prohibition increases crime, is costly, and is utterly ineffective.

 

15 billion is a lot of money spent on the prohibition. Even more so in opportunity costs; that money could half the amount of people in hunger around the world (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/04/news/04iht-04food.13446176.html).

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but the data is clear.

 

Data are clear. Sorry, this bugs the hell out of me for some reason.

 

I don't necessarily disagree with your overall point. If alcohol is legal, weed probably should be too (since it is comparatively less dangerous). I also agree that it is a huge waste of time and resources to incarcerate people for a recreational drug with few (if any) adverse effects on anyone other than the user (e.g., nobody robs a liquor store to feed a marijuana habit).

 

That said, if your position is marijuana is harmless you're probably fooling yourself. I say probably because I know a handful people who have used recreationally for years with no apparent ill effects, but I've known a lot more users who never amounted to much of anything, whose life seems to revolve around getting high. I'll grant this is almost certainly a correlation, and I'll also grant it is purely anecdotal.

 

With people your age: over the years some of my best students have smoked occassionally (and one or two who smoked regularly), but the vast majority of the heavy users have been my C, D, and F students. Marijuana may not turn you into a heroin junkie down the road (at least I hope not, since this is a very bad scene indeed-- for those who haven't had the misfortune of watching someone they care about go down this road), but, based on my experience (limited, but probably more extensive than most), the rap that "marijuana saps motivation" seems true most of the time.

 

Then there's the small problem of its illegality. If you are caught holding or using, bad things happen to you, and if you're over a certain age, the record of those bad things stay with you forever. It probably shouldn't be that way, but that's the reality of the situation.

 

My advice (not that I think anyone is going to follow it) is not to smoke.

 

15 billion is a lot of money spent on the prohibition. Even more so in opportunity costs; that money could half the amount of people in hunger around the world (http://www.nytimes.c...d.13446176.html).

 

A waste of money, certainly, but this money would much more likely be spent on weapons than feeding the world.

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Data are clear. Sorry, this bugs the hell out of me for some reason.

 

Truth.

 

Also, this thread seems like a good place for me to mention one of my ideas I'm playing with in my head. I think a very strong case could be made that the sole role of government is to resolve tragedies of the commons, prisoners dilemmas, and other similar issues. Does that seem defensible? Are there any obvious exceptions which the government should be doing?

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I smoke weed everyday. Sometimes even 3 times a day. But i must be honest and say I have been addicted to cocaine and had to rehab. That being said weed is cool

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look plain and simple illegalization is not stopping the problem. why waste money putting people in jail for a drug equvalent to ciggaretts. just legalize it and tax it trust me it would sell

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With people your age: over the years some of my best students have smoked occassionally (and one or two who smoked regularly), but the vast majority of the heavy users have been my C, D, and F students. Marijuana may not turn you into a heroin junkie down the road (at least I hope not, since this is a very bad scene indeed-- for those who haven't had the misfortune of watching someone they care about go down this road), but, based on my experience (limited, but probably more extensive than most), the rap that "marijuana saps motivation" seems true most of the time.

 

That connection seems to have some causality issues.

 

People who structure their lives around immediate gratification (for whatever reason) may look to weed as one way of getting that immediate gratification. But it could hardly said that weed made that happen. Were weed non-existent, their desire for immediate gratification would simply be met another way.

 

It seems comparatively more likely that weed is just one way slackers slack off, rather than causing little model citizens to become drop out drug users.

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Weed damages your chromosomes. So not only do you screw yourself up, but you also jncrease the chance of passing on genetic disease to your children.

 

That is why weed is worse than booze and baccy.

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