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I need some help with IARs

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I really need some help with IAR's, but my partner and I haven't been able to find a method that makes my IAR's any better. Hopefully the CX community could give me some suggestions as to what to practice to make my IAR's better?

Thanks

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Well, I can't say I have a lot of experience, but most of the judges (VSS) liked how I didn't try to go for everything. I would bring the debate back down to size. Essentially an analytical for the (usually) 3 key issues.

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Um...not going for everything in the 1st affirmative rebuttal? You mean dropping things? I hope we aren't talking about the same thing...

 

If you are indeed talking about the 1st affirmative rebuttal, it shouldn't be that hard to make a good 1AR if the negative made any arguements in the negative block. Just write down everything they say, in order, and then in the 1AR do it line-by-line. Pace yourself if you have lots to cover, give yourself 10 seconds per arguement or whatever is a good time slot to refute everything. Just don't repeat yourself. If you have lots to cover, it is best to try not to read any evidence, but instead extend evidence previously read to refute whatever point you need it to refute, and tell why that evidence is better. Structure and being organized in your responses is the best way to go about it. The arguements just fill in by themselves.

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I don't ever read cards in the 1AR. Extending arguments is always important - reference them properly and find relevant ones. The judge gets happy when flowing becomes easier. Pacing yourself is important, too - don't leave topicality for the end, it should be first! Run through it as quick as possible, having prewritten blocks for this is helpful. I would reccomend spending no more then a minute on each issue. Depending on their number of arguments, decide how many arguments you think you can get done in a minute and answer those only. Be analytical, say things like "This isn't true because...." and always, always, extend as many arguments as you can.

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The 1AR is the best speech in the whole debate, so being convincing is important for the affirmative. Time allocation comes with time, and use grouping if you can but never group unrelated things. My best suggestion if to spend 45 seconds on T MAX and be sure to say something on everything, even if it's just a blip.

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extend group the debate answer, dont waste words like "they said that CMR going down bla bla bla" use they said CMR down is bad

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group arguements together. It saves time and is very effective.

 

Lets take for example, advantages.

 

"A. We solve for armed conflict.

B. conflict between nations stops with our plan.

C. Warring factions stop fighting."

 

 

You could group all of those together by saying "In those 3 advantages, they all mention stopping war/conflict, well I say..." and then you give your response.

 

A good hint is try to write all your responses during the speeches. Take some downtime to prep some more, but when they are reading the card, be writing down responses. Be sure to make clear what you are saying, and be fast at the same time.

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1) Always use the CX time from your partner to write answers, there are FOUR speeches (3 of which are negative >_<) for which you have to listen to. ALWAYS Abuse C-X by writing answer while your partner stands up for 3 minutes. It's essentially extra prep. Don't waste too much time on your 2AC prep, but save some for your 2AR (Maybe 30 seconds just to get your thoughts in order) and have them together for your 1AR.

2) When you stand up, it's not a bad idea to say "First, please extend all of our arguments the negative has dropped."

3) Group. Grouping is huge for 1ARs. Use your time well, and if you have to, kick the negatives weakest argument. Never EVER drop anything that would kill you (such as Nuclear War impacts or T)

4) Use time well. Don't undercover, spend enough time to cover it, then go on. Try not to repeat yourself in your answers, as it essentially wastes time.

5) Should be all Analytics, so don't worry about getting cards together.

6. Cross Apply. Pull arguments from other parts of the debate to answer responses. EX: Pull across advantages that may solve for a DA they placed on you, and it becomes an advantage in itself.

 

Good Luck with it.

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Most people generally overthink the 1AR. Make sure just to relax and have fun with it. It's the best speech in the round. My advice is essentially the same thing as everyone else's:

 

1.) Don't waste too much prep on the 1AR. Stand ups are always fun [just make sure you know you have everything].

 

2.) If they dropped something crucial on T or a DA or something(i.e., your counter interp) say something along the lines of: "They dropped our counter interp, which they dropped. Because they did that, you will always prefer the aff interp of the resolution, which means that we're topical. Extend standards of.... and extend our voters of... We win."

 

3.) Be concise and clear. Don't waste too much time being flowery with, "She pulled this all the way through magnificently."

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My advice (me being a 1A):

 

1) Pay attention to how much time they spend on an argument (for example, if they cover 1 subpoint of a DA for :30 then you'll need to spend about :10 seconds there)

 

2) Steal C-X/Other speeches' prep (See above ^-)

 

3) I try to cover everything (not useful unless you are much faster than the other team (which, many times for me is false)). Don't do that.

 

4) Know your plan/what you say in all parts of the 1AC. Extending case is important to the 1AR and extending case requires that you know your case inside/out/both ways

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ok here goes, always try and wiegh the most important things in the round(like d/a's and or harms) usualy you can get away with saying that case outwieghs(but make sure it does first), try not to spend to much time on topicality, most judges are sick of hearing about it by the end of the 2ac. be fluuid in your answers and make sure you make your point very clear as to why you have won.above all else though, don't get emotional and have fun with it, also remember to ask the judge to vote aff at the end of the speech.

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I havent given a 1ar in quite some time but I think that I did an okay job when I did it. I think that one of the most important things if not the most important is to bring a piece or paper up with you or write on your flow how much time you want to spend on each particular position. I also think that "I never read evidence in the 1ar" is a bad assumption. There are not so intelligent teams that will read an add on advantage in the 2ac and then get 13 minutes of turns in the block and at that point you are forced to read cards in the 1ar. for instance, Heg add on in the 2ac. Neg team kicks the cp, 3 das and case and just reads 13 minutes of heg bad in the block. AFF team=fucked, you had better be a very fast 1ar and be packing shit tons of cards.

 

 

thanks

jamie

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Actually, reading new cards in the 1AR is a strategically sound move. It makes the 2NR really tough because they're already streched for prep. Just make sure that they're merely fortification of arguments you've already made... ie: reading new uniqueness evidence on politics when you've already read uniqueness evidence in the 2ac. But you shouldn't read new link turns in the 1ar.

 

Moreover, try to make your 1AR full of offense. If you put offense on every sheet of paper, then that forces the neg to go to every sheet of paper in the 2NR, a speech that is already pretty hard. Moreover, it makes the 2AR easier to win because you could win a risk of a new advantage instead of just going for case outweighs.

 

If feasible, straight turn the dispo counterplan. It makes you in control of the debate and forces the neg to go for something. Although its risky, it screws with the 2NR's mind because you are forcing them into a position that they didn't envision.

 

And its a 1AR, not a IAR.

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all of you people are over interpreting the importance of the 1ar. some people get too much into the 1ar. everyone says its the hardest speech ever. seeing as i am the 1a...the only importance of the 1ar is EXTENDING the 2AC arguements and explaining why they are better then the arguements brought up in the neg block. THATS IT. if you do have time read cards to only important arguements that you know for sure the neg is going for in the 2nr...thats if there is time.

 

also if there is just not enough time...the 1ar can choose for him/her-self what the negative is going for. i find it funny lol. but choose the ones that you know they are going for like if the 1nc is 2t's 3 d/a's 1 cp 1k and bad case you obviously know they are going for the cp or k.

 

CHOOSE THE RIGHT ARGUEMENTS AND EXTEND THE 2AC!!!!

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you know what you are so right, i cant believe that I didnt see it before. If the the negative team reads a whole bunch of new offense in the block or defense, which they will you should still just extend 2ac responses :rollseyes:

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yeah when every 2ac point has 1-5 responces on it "extend" really dosnt do the the job, you need to beat back 1-5 responces, then extend, then explain how that point matters. You end up with 1-5 extensions per flow at the most...... I think its the hardest speach if the neg team is good.

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Well, I can't say I have a lot of experience, but most of the judges (VSS) liked how I didn't try to go for everything. I would bring the debate back down to size. Essentially an analytical for the (usually) 3 key issues.

 

YOU DIDNT GO FOR EVERYTHING IN THE 1AR?!?! ;ajdf;aldjf;ladjfdasf. novii, don't listen to this fool. 1ars are tough primarily BECAUSE you have to go for everything from the neg block- 13 minutes answered in 5. The best way to approach 1ars is to concentrate on your line by line debate. and the only way to improve your line by line is to start flowing correctly. i cant tell you how many novviis i have seen mess up their line by line simply because their flows were messy or incomplete. after that, you're set. good luck =)

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1) Pay attention to how much time they spend on an argument (for example, if they cover 1 subpoint of a DA for :30 then you'll need to spend about :10 seconds there)

this is really good advice, but not always true, i mean because one tourney I wasn't with my reg. partner, and our big neg strat was narrowing it down to two off (the T and K) in the block and the entire first rebuttal was spent on T when we both knew that we were actually going for the K in the end. so I'd say yeah, but also actually observe the other team and see if they give any hints as to their strat

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this is really good advice, but not always true, i mean because one tourney I wasn't with my reg. partner, and our big neg strat was narrowing it down to two off (the T and K) in the block and the entire first rebuttal was spent on T when we both knew that we were actually going for the K in the end. so I'd say yeah, but also actually observe the other team and see if they give any hints as to their strat

 

this is a regular strat and is what a lot of teams do. this is also not always true because you may be planning on going for the K, but if they completely under cover T or something, you may need to go for T. for instance, ayla, jason and i could have kicked your ass on the K in that round and then you would have had to go for T. ;)

also, some people have said that you must cover everything, which is not always true, you need to answer the things that would lose you the round. given, it is always good to try and answer everything, but its not always necessary. good flowing does come on handy because you can really give a good line-by-line, but you also need to recognize the round winners and cover those more. you should also cross-apply a lot and be reallly concise. dont repeat yourself, and watch your time. your 1ar's will get better with time, but you should also give rebuttal re-do's. these help a lot. just remember, the 1ar is the hardest speech in the round!

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for instance, ayla, jason and i could have kicked your ass on the K in that round and then you would have had to go for T. ;)

wow...i hate it when this happens....you know who i am but im lost as to who you are.....obviously i hit you though....hmm, it must have been at regan with Nick. but i still can't place you seeing how we kinda went pretty far that tournament (and it was all nick lol)

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this is a regular strat and is what a lot of teams do. this is also not always true because you may be planning on going for the K, but if they completely under cover T or something, you may need to go for T. for instance, ayla, jason and i could have kicked your ass on the K in that round and then you would have had to go for T. ;)

also, some people have said that you must cover everything, which is not always true, you need to answer the things that would lose you the round. given, it is always good to try and answer everything, but its not always necessary. good flowing does come on handy because you can really give a good line-by-line, but you also need to recognize the round winners and cover those more. you should also cross-apply a lot and be reallly concise. dont repeat yourself, and watch your time. your 1ar's will get better with time, but you should also give rebuttal re-do's. these help a lot. just remember, the 1ar is the hardest speech in the round!

 

yes finally someone who agrees with me. thats what i said in my post!!!

 

kelcey you rock my sox

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wow...i hate it when this happens....you know who i am but im lost as to who you are.....obviously i hit you though....hmm, it must have been at regan with Nick. but i still can't place you seeing how we kinda went pretty far that tournament (and it was all nick lol)

 

we debated you in semis of reagan. you were neg and went for biopower.

 

yes finally someone who agrees with me. thats what i said in my post!!!

 

and yes, this is the advice i got frommany judges after i tried to go for everything in the 1ar. then, after i started covering the most important things, the judges said they liked the 1ar.

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Having given every speech i find the 1AR to be the second easiest speech in the round. At first it may look difficult (covering 13 min in 5) but if you have a sound strat in the 2ac (very offensive, variety of arguments, etc) then its not hard at all.

 

First you need to figure out what the 2nr wants to go for and what the 2nr doesnt want to go for. If a certain team always goes for T, spending 30 seconds isnt very strategic, likewise if they never go for T spending over a minute is probably a little too much as well.

 

Second you dont need to answer everything "line by line" you need to group, extend, and read. Grouping the debate ends a lot of the time tradeoff and extending 2ac argumentsis pretty important. Reading cards is almost always essential, make sure they are highlighted down a lot and make sure your not reading cards on a position you are already ahead in.

 

I had a big problems with my 1ar in the begining because I was treating them like a 2ar, giving lots of analysis, not going quick, etc. To overcome this problem I wrote lots of 1AR blocks and when I wanted to extend something, I just read from it. After a while I could do it without the blocks and my 1AR became much better.

 

Also it is Important to have good word economy. A 1AR who is really slow but really efficient is a better 1ar than one who is really fast but says the same thing over and over. Once you said it move on. If theres one thing that seperates a good 1ar from a bad 1ar its being efficient

 

The most important thing to remember for the 1ar is that practice makes perfect. If debate tournaments are your only source of practice for 1ar's then your in a bit of trouble. Timing 1ar blocks, reading them a bunch of times, practice rounds, etc. Are essential if you want to give a good 1AR. Otherwise the 1ar will never be "the second easiest" and always be "the second hardest"

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